11 Apr 2010

UPDATED JIM GAMBLE TELLS FACEBOOK ANTI PAEDOPHILE MEASURES STILL NOT GOOD ENOUGH!

As Facebook begin to buckle by adopting a panic button but not on the main page Jim Gamble is joined by top UK cops in condemning the site's lamentable attitude towards nicking child abusers and safeguarding our children.

When we read about the Little Ted's Nursery case, tiny tots, mostly less than 18 months old being seriously assaulted and then the sickening images shared on Facebook, thousands of times and the ringleader demanding yet more "messages", just what does it take to get them to act responsibly and try and stop people who abuse children in such an horrific way? The panic button to CEOP will mean that the Police do not stumble upon these hideous people by accident when some shocked person finds the images on a computer, they will have positive leads to those abusers direct from the children they are seeking to abuse.

This is what Jim Gamble wants to do, he wants to go after those child abusers and get them with potentially hundreds of leads every single day. Now what normal person could criticise him for that?

All these sick Kate and Gerry supporters have just used this as a stick to beat him with, because he wants to aggressively protect children, that figures! They never say anything about little Maddie, other than perhaps well she is dead!

He also wants the panic button to as as a deterrent to positively protect children, commenting:

“They need to make some decisions. Do they want to be the website of choice for bullies, for dangerous individuals, for rapists and murderers?”

If I was running Facebook I would not allow any commercial interests to override that obvious decision that needs to be made, and it is exemplified in the McCann case, childrens welfare just has to come first, before money and before adults



Police tell Facebook: your efforts to combat paedophiles are not enough

Site is criticised for failing to adopt a panic button that would allow users to report concerns

By Mark Hughes, Crime Correspondent


Wednesday, 14 April 2010
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AP

There are 24 million Facebook users in the UK

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Facebook has come under attack from Britain's most senior police officers, who have criticised the social-networking giant for refusing to adopt a "panic button" which would allow victims of online sexual grooming to report their concerns directly to the authorities.


The social-networking site yesterday announced that it would adopt the "button", designed by the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), on one page of its site – a page which appears when users have already decided to report abuse. But it is still refusing to adopt the button on every page of its site, as requested by Britian's online protection agency, because it claims that to do so could create "additional complexity" and may result in fewer people reporting grooming.

Yesterday, in a letter signed by chief constables from 43 police forces across Britain, senior police officers said that the steps taken by the social-networking giant are not good enough.

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Facebook's announcement came after Jim Gamble, the chief executive of CEOP, travelled to Washington DC to discuss the implementation of the "button" on each page of the website, allowing Facebook users to report suspicions of sexual grooming directly to the authorities.

After the four-hour meeting, which both sides said was "constructive", Facebook said that it would introduce a link to CEOP's reporting system which would appear when users decided to report abuse via the site's own measures. It also said it would invest £5m in education about how to stay safe online – a relatively tiny amount for a company valued at more than £9bn.

While acknowledging the concessions, Mr Gamble said the situation was still not satisfactory. "The critical issues remain unresolved," he said. "We believe that – without the deterrence provided by direct visible access to the CEOP button on every page – children will not be empowered, parents cannot be reassured and the offender will not be deterred.

"During yesterday's constructive meeting with Facebook they did not say 'No' to the button. We are hopeful that, once theyhave considered their position, they will take the critical final step to make their environment safer by adopting the direct CEOP link."

The police officers' letter, sent to Facebook, said: "In the real world we do not filter reports through another organisation or company; the individual simply picks up a phone or visits their local police station. The 'CLICK CEOP' mechanism offers such a reporting service for the 21st-century citizen."

The argument over whether the button should be adopted by the site came up again last month when Peter Chapman, 33, was jailed for raping and murdering 17-year-old Ashleigh Hall after luring her to her death by posing on Facebook as a 19-year-old boy. Mr Gamble pointed out that other social-networking sites such as Bebo had introduced the button and he could seen no reason why Facebook would not.

And, last week, Mr Gamble said that in the first quarter of this year CEOP had received 253 reports concerning grooming activity on Facebook, yet only one came from the Facebook team operating its own internal reporting mechanism.

Previously the website's stance has been attacked by Chris Huhne, the Liberal Democrats' home affairs spokesman. And yesterday's letter includes the signature of Sir Paul Stephenson, the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police and Britain's most senior officer. Mr Gamble said: "If they don't adopt the button we are simply not going to go away. We need to protect the children of the UK."

Last night Facebook defended its new measures and insisted it was committed to protecting its users from online paedophiles.

Richard Allen, Facebook's director of policy for Europe, said: "We completely accept that our users should be able to report abuse directly to CEOP but we disagree on the best design solution to implement that.

"From our experience, 'buttons' produce less good results in terms of people actually reporting abuse. They intimidate and confuse people. We think our simple text link is a far more effective solution.

"All we are saying is that when it come to the specifics of how to design online reporting systems we have considerable expertise."

Panic button: The supporters

NSPCC

Founded in 1884, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children is one of the most recognisable child cruelty charities. It is also among the largest, employing around 2,500 staff. It merged with Childline, another big child welfare charity, in 2006.

Beatbullying

An anti-bullying charity focused on helping youngsters lead campaigns in their schools and communities. It says its work has reached 700,000 young people in the past five years.

ACPO

The Association of Chief Police Officers is an independent body uniting the most important members of every police force in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. An umbrella organisation with the status of a private company, ACPO unites all 44 police authorities. Its 349 members all hold the rank of Chief Constable, Deputy Chief Constable or Assistant Chief Constable, or their equivalents.

UKCCIS

The UK Council for Child Internet Safety was established by the Government in the wake of Dr Tanya Byron's report into digital child safety – it brings together representatives from across the UK internet safety industry in an advisory capacity. It does not have lobbying power as such; instead, it brings together groups dedicated to the protection of children, aiming to inform policy.

In numbers

£9.1bn Estimated valuation of Facebook as of January, at a share price of £21 each

400m The number of "active" Facebook users.

100m The number of people who access Facebook from their mobile phones worldwide.

60m The number of status updates posted each day.

£42m Paid to Divya Narendra and Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss after they accused the site of stealing their ideas.

24m The number of Facebook users in the UK.

29m The number of people worldwide who play the third-party Facebook game "Farmville".

25 The number of complaints about Facebook received by Ceop in the first three months of this year, 99 of which were reported instances of grooming.


Complaints about grooming and bullying on Facebook quadruple


Facebook has been accused by police of “arrogantly” ignoring children’s safety after it emerged that the number of complaints of alleged grooming and bullying on the site have almost quadrupled this year.



By Richard Edwards, Crime Correspondent

Published: 7:00AM BST 09 Apr 2010





A total of 252 Facebook complaints were made to police in the past three months Photo: AP Jim Gamble, the senior policeman responsible for child protection online, said that officers have seen a significant increase in complaints from parents and children reporting alleged paedophiles, bullies and hackers who are exploiting the site.



But he disclosed that Facebook’s own checkers, who insist they have a secure internal system, had failed to report a single alleged paedophile to police themselves.





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Facebook snubs government demands for panic button

'One mistake' cost teenager her life Mr Gamble said he had “real concerns” about the internet giant's work to protect children and condemned their refusal to embed a "panic" button to each user’s profile page, which he claimed would deter paedophiles and protect children.



Speaking in London yesterday, Mr Gamble, who leads the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (Ceop), said the button was used on other sites and backed by campaigners, expert online groups and charities such as Childline.



He said: “Is Facebook so arrogant that it does not mind what the collective child protection community think?



“They are experts commercially, but I do not see them as being experts in child protection.



“What Facebook do not understand is prevention, and acting as a deterrent.”



Mr Gamble is flying to Washington DC on Monday where he will present a “dossier” of evidence to Facebook bosses.



“We are going to tell them to do the right thing for child protection,” he said.



Speaking about social networking website in general, Mr Gamble added: “They need to make some decisions. Do they want to be the website of choice for bullies, for dangerous individuals, for rapists and murderers?”



A total of 252 Facebook complaints were made to police in the past three months – at almost quadruple the rate of complaints last year, when 292 were received in 12 months.



Mr Gamble said: "None of these complaints came direct from Facebook.



"If their system is so robust and they are receiving so many reports and concerns from young people, then where are they?"



Facebook has more than 400m users worldwide and recently overtook Google as the most visited website in the US. It continues to grow rapidly - attracting 23 million new users in January.



The issue of its safety came to a head last month following the conviction of a serial rapist for the murder of schoolgirl Ashleigh Hall.



Peter Chapman posed as a young boy on the site to lure the 17-year-old to her death in Sedgefield, County Durham.



A spokesman for Facebook said: "We take the issue of safety very seriously, and recently met the Home Secretary to discuss online safety.



"We are due to meet with Ceop next week to talk them through our safety strategy. We will wait to have this meeting prior to sharing our plans more widely with the public soon afterwards."

4 comments:

viv said...

There is this hardened group of internet bloggers on the McCann case who mercilessly attack Jim Gamble and CEOP. Including his plans to try and better safeguard children online by panic buttons on Facebook, these bloggers call this "bully boy tactics by Gamble".

These bloggers just insist well Madeleine just died that night plain and simple it was probably an accident and they covered it up and staged an abduction.

I can think of no good reason why Jim Gamble would protect the McCanns as suggested, and neither can I think of any good reason why adults would object to children having panic buttons to protect them from abuse that could even entail their murder as has actually happened unless of course there is something very seriously wrong with those adults.

These bloggers send a cold chill down my spine and you know who you are, one of them even used to post on here a long time ago, drumming up support for "3 Arguidos". That is the problem with the web, people can pretend to be something they are not, decent people, but in the end their attitudes display what they really are.

viv said...

and if you try and disagree with these bloggers, dare to suggest well it is wrong to just keep branding a missing child dead, dare to suggest that something else may have happened to her, something involving paedophilia perhaps, you are subjected to exactly the sort of bullying and harassment that Jim Gamble is referring to above. Bullying, intimidation, control freaks, paedophiles, no concern about Madeleine at all. Just a bandwagon to jump on that they feel they personally need to defend.

Wizard said...

Morning All,

I was just watching yesterday’s McCanns’ interview with Lorraine Kelly. I see most of the talking was left to Kate - a wise move. GM’s coaching, no doubt to pre-known and rehearsed questions, was well worth shelling out for as he came over as less arrogant and certainly not belligerent – his usual persona.

Kelly with much looking at the floor and everywhere but at the McCanns did ask one tricky question when she said a number of people are “convinced you had something to do with it.” Kate gives a well rehearsed response replying there is a “small minority who pick on a vulnerable family.” This piece of spin again turns them back into the victim. I believe a lot was paid out from the fund to give a relaxed and natural polish to this interview and it paid off inasmuch as it made them look less compromised.

Their body language although more relaxed is still not right – I have never known two people blink so much. The blinking seems to increase when their answers become more creative but on stock questions/answers ie ‘Madeleine was three when she went missing’ the Mac’s confirm this at length and very little blinking occurs.

Kate McCann said “….most do not think it right or fair to add to our misery but there is a minority whose job it is to pick on a vulnerable family – when they have finished with us they will move onto another vulnerable family.”

Hmm… good answer. I suppose a prime suspect is always in a vulnerable position as they could be found out at anytime and life must be difficult. Most people and the police believe it right and proper to probe a likely perpetrator to get at the truth despite being uncomfortable for the suspect - justice for the victim should be the primary concern. Unfortunately the prime suspect telling their accusers “it wasn’t me” is not going to make people go away.

Wizard said...

Morning All,

I was just watching yesterday’s McCanns’ interview with Lorraine Kelly. I see most of the talking was left to Kate - a wise move. GM’s coaching, to no doubt pre-known and rehearsed questions, was well worth shelling out for as he came over as less arrogant and certainly not belligerent – his usual persona.

Kelly with much looking at the floor and anywhere but at the McCanns did ask one tricky question when she said a number of people are “convinced you had something to do with it.” Kate gives a well rehearsed response replying there is a “small minority who pick on a vulnerable family.” This piece of spin again turns them back into the victim. I believe a lot was paid out from the fund to give a relaxed and natural polish to this interview and it paid off inasmuch as it made them look less compromised.

Their body language although more relaxed is still not right – I have never known two people blink so much. The blinking seems to increase when their answers become more creative but on stock questions/answers ie ‘Madeleine was three when she went missing’ the Mac’s confirm this and no to little blinking occurs.

Kate McCann said “….most do not think it right or fair to add to our misery but there is a minority whose job it is to pick on a vulnerable family – when they have finished with us they will move onto another vulnerable family.”

Hmm… good answer. I suppose a prime suspect is always in a vulnerable position as they could be found out at anytime and life must be difficult. Most people and the police believe it right and proper to probe a likely perpetrator to get to the truth. Unfortunately the prime suspect telling their accusers “it wasn’t me” isn't going to make people go away.